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20121008
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solutions for that. that is how we keep engaged. that is how we bring technology right to the neighborhoods to allow people to suggest how we improve. you are asking the population to tell you what is wrong? >> absolutely. =::év2 it's better than them coming to the mayor's office to tell me everyday? >> they do that? >> oh, yeah. >> >> they just show up to the mayor's office? when i go to the tech companies, they usually give me 15 minutes with the employees and i listen carefully to them because they have the talent and if i can satisfy them and they stay in the city, the tech companis will stay in the city. >> any other points that you want to talk about? >> sf city is our citizens initiative for technology and innovation. that is what i call the technology chamber of commerce and we have over 300 companies now that are members. they are helping us figure out how to make sure that the companies are here, comfortably, but also how we train the new workforce to continue this fantastic growth in employment with the technology companies. >> and these companies are paying? >> oh, yes.
much. keep us focused on central market, too. tom from riverbed technology, thank you. trent, thank you very much for all of your great work. jimena from bank of america, thank you very much for stepping up. [applause] finally, the largest body we have today, but one of the most important ones, one that today we have shared appointments with the board of supervisors is our youth commission. [applause] yes. i assure you that people from this body, as well as all the other bodies, will one day see somebody standing in my place or in the place of the people standing by the side of meat and their respective offices. our youth are important. whether it is public safety, education, free muni, all the things we deem important to make this city healthy. you are charged with helping us with the best inclusion and policies we can have to keep families vibrant, keep our youth a safe, keep them motivated, and keep all of us paying attention to our next generation of people who will inherit everything we do and will inherit the good things as well as the bad things. with your help, there will be les
. and introduce to you a man who is certainly no stranger to bringing clean technology to san francisco and electric vehicles, are mayor, ed lee. [applause] >> thank you, bob. >> you for your leadership. good morning, everyone. we are going to be talking about something that i have been very interested in, and that is mobility. the ability to have technology work for you, like this microphone. we have worked hard for a number of years. i had the privilege of working with gavin newsom in the past to during his administration to create the electric vehicle infrastructure for the city and began the conversation and the collaboration with the other counties to bring an electric vehicle corridor. it signals our efforts to support the creation of infrastructure to the electric vehicle industry. of course we have encouraged the private automobile creators to join us. today is a wonderful opportunity to do that with a bmw. any of you who noticed the labels in this city, you will certainly noticed the popularity of bmw as a corporation, not only a great company but one that is also on the cuttin
to shrink their space by a third, without losing any jobs. part of that is technology. part of that is the efficiency of the building. part of is it is hoteling, but if you think about their traditional tenants and all the tenants in america get smaller by 30% without firing anybody, we wouldn't have to build any office buildinged for a long period of time. so what is remarkable about what is going on in the bay area, we have been able to absorb that contraction in the tenants, which jk put on the front page today and managed to overwhelm that with growth in technology and technology-related tenants, which is why what is going on in the bay area today is so extraordinary relative to what is going on in the rest of commercial real estate across the country. when we look at this, in practical terms, here is a prototypically way for a tenant in an office building. this layout allows people to reach a ratio of 110 square feet per person or over nine people per thousand square feet. this density, i think, is very important. it means a couple of things. first, it means that san f
thousands of more jobs, creating an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want t
another year. we promise it's going to reflect creative, diversity and technologically savvy of the bay area. one mission today, a world-class venue. a beacon for the warriors. [ music ] [ music ] we're all in. i hope to sigh at the ribbon-cuting in 2017 with a smile from a journey well-done. we watch that every morning to get your juices flowing. [ laughter ] san francisco deserves it. how crazy is that san francisco -- there is no city in america half the size of san francisco that does not offer world-class, multi-purpose arena and san francisco has never had it, with all due respect to the cal pals. [ laughter ] we are prepared to spend over $100 million to renovate that pier, those piers, which are now crumbling into the bay and whose primary purpose is to serve as a parking lot. this project is going to reclaim this part of the city as a wonderful public asset for all citizens to enjoy. that is a 13-acre site. so imagine as part of this project over four acres of new public space that will be incorporated into the design. and appropriate for transit for a city like san francisc
more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, w
between paris and san francisco have made innovations, technology and the spirit of enterprise and all those elements together enable a concrete relationship between paris and san francisco and even remember it last time, with had a virtual highway between san francisco and paris, we started this virtual highway, it had a lot of babies and a lot of [inaudible] in paris and in san francisco was created, were developed from this common belief that we had in innovation, in research and with the need of building economic development on new technology, on new ways of living and creating wealth and progress of the 21st century. and it's in this spirit that with [inaudible] that i'm happy to salute with all my friendship, we are going to start a new period of our links, our ties, mayor lee is a very popular man, a very popular mayor and i want to know first the reputation of the people of san francisco through him and through his progress. we have another common link, we believe that innovation can be noble if it starts many the people, so from the intervention of people in the democracy, a d
are in negotiations to get us into our fleet so we can utilize. unless we do it with the latest technology, people will not appreciate the mayor driving a bmw. [laughter] but we are doing it for the right reasons. i want to showcase that as we lead this country into a thought process, a challenge that our major cities, our urban settings can have solutions to our parking problems, have sustainable mobility as part of our alternatives in the vehicles and car-sharing as a principle for us to join our automobile makers as well as our vehicle owners and rentals as we challenge the public to say there are better choices coming forward with our partners in the industry. thank you, bmw. i know that ian and his team are here to announce this thing but i wanted to thank our environmental divisions, our car enthusiasts, our technology. we are the innovation capital of the world. clearly there is a major role for our manufacturers to use that technology to figure out and provide solutions to our parking challenges, to the affordability and everybody to participate so that they can use all of the different mo
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spe
in common is we use technology -- in our cases, an online platform -- that actually lowers the barrier -- the barrier of entry so people across the social spectrum can engage. you do not need to have a second home in a fancy condo buildings in this city. you can have an extra count that you want to rent out, and you can find access to travelers from all over the world who also do not have the resources to spend money on a $200 hotel bill who want to say on your couch, and that is really democratizing travel, not just access to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals just with the kit and may never meet the people they are s
and about 500 consultants. puc is really embracing technology. we wanted to make sure we really had a system that would elevate all issues so we could address them in a timely manner. as you know, time is money. we have a construction management information system. it is a great tool to help us address construction and make it successful, as it is today. cmis is one of the first major tools we put in place. the next one is the san francisco online invoicing, where we are now working with the contractor and consultant to have them submit their invoices online. we are also working on electronic bidding systems. another way we can reduce the paperwork and all the other issues tied with the procurements. i live in san francisco. i am a rate-payer. i really care about the way we spend our money. systems like this that will allow transparency, clarity, accountability, and efficiency -- i think systems like this need to be applied to all parts of the city. we really strive to lead and embraced technology so we can be ahead of the game. [applause] >> we are spending $15 million per week just on our
and technology programs at the night digital media center at uc-berkeley. next is the managing is theidd -- managing director at idd ventures sf. nexus' the editor in chief of marketwatch.com, part of news corp. -- next is the editor in chief. the co-founder and senior community manager of oakland local, a nonprofit media that promotes public discourse on issues. in the front row is a media analyst, who publishes an was a key developer of the mercury center. next to him is an assistant professor of broadcast and electronic media at san francisco state university. next is the managing editor for local news at -- i'm sorry. he is not at yahoo!, right. he is editor-in-chief of patch.com, a division of aol that provides news to specific communities. very local. after him, we have the managing director for local news at yahoo.com, guiding the company's local coverage nationwide. last but not least is the senator who represents san francisco and san mateo counties, and he is the recipient of spj's freedom of information award in 2010. that is our panel. back to you, rose. >> before we start, i
comments. i think the video tells a lot. i think it is great technology, great use of technology. to me it does show most of the shadow is in the early morning hours, at least the parks. i think it is important to look at the total package, as we are doing. again in a second round when we look at projects independently. i concur with commissioner moore's comments that it is not just parks affected but maybe building alleys. how many other building alleys in the part of san francisco that may be for us down the road. i know we are not looking at that portion. but i think it is worthy of talking about. glad you did bring that up. as far as parks, i'm concerned about portsmouth square. i realize the shower is early in morning and before t'ai chi but i'm hoping the 12.5 million allocated, that we bring portsmouth square high tore the priority list. if possible relaying or reformatting that park so the open stays where the t'ai chi is is not in the shadowed area. commissioner wu's comments about the importance of parks in china town, she is absolutely right. * some of the sros or apartments
,500 jobs in last year. including 13 new jobs in the technology sector alone. unemployment during the last two years when i first began as your interim mayor went from 9.6 to 7.6, two full digit points during that time. to translate that means 25,000 san franciscans are back to work this last year. and according to the recent department of labor report, san francisco, the metropolitan area had the strongest job growth in the last 12 months ending in july of 2012, and let me repeat, the strongest job growth in the country. no. 1 in the nation. [ applause ] thanks to all of you. and i also want to just share with you something that supervisors and i have been discussing intently. because i know joan was going through a lot of the projects and so was mary and when we're investing in the brook and mortar and developments to also be sure, i think the most dynamic part of what our city is doing is that we're investing in our people. we're making sure that san franciscans not only go to work, but they are part of and engaged with us in all of these developments. and that, to me, is refreshing and
have been dubbed the center for clean technology in the united states. our goal of reaching the zero waste in 20/20 -- 2020 is a real goal. . companies are popping up in our city. we recently signed a memorandum of understanding in beijing with the national energy conservation center where our leader of our economic development represented our city. in agreeing to sustain and share the best practices as it relates to energy efficiency and sustainability and of course, which my good friend and our u.s. ambassador, gary locke, had washed over. not to mention that we're the home to the california institute of regenerative madison -- medicine. mission bay is a destination for those who want to make history in by a life sciences and biotech discoveries. -- vio lifbio life scientists ad biotech discoveries. u2 -- for making that a cause for future generations and we will discover in that corridor those live science drugs that will help us end these dreadful diseases for generations to come. thank you, lieutenant governor. [applause] i wanted to welcome the delegates who come here under the
screen theaters; the smaller theaters because of the cost of movies and technology has become more and more difficult to keep those alive; it is disappointing but at the same time in this case we are able to do something interesting and innovative, and potentially being able to have movies, and have restaurant-expanded space and do interesting events; i love the idea of micro-businesses. i have been to the space and courtland. innovative concept. with the pop-ups going up, different kinds of food businesses, it seems like a hot time for people to have an opportunity to try their hand of the space before they find a brick-and-mortar space. i approve. >> it could take the ability of have a movie house within the thing; i hope that the bib lebovsky is the first movie shown. >> on that motion? (voting) thank you the motion passes unanimously. you are now item 14, 2012.0662g, 3014 california street. >> good afternoon commissioners. item before you is a discretionary use. proposals to legalize conversion of the subject building from a two unit building to a single-family building; no ot
and technological advancements, the world has become very small. this has many benefits as -- and pitfalls, as anything else. our geography has tremendously improved. now we know where greece is. we even know where afghanistan, iraq, and iran are. i remember when i came to the united states from iran to go to school, i had to fill out some applications and they have some boxes. the boxes were caucasian, black, asian, hispanic, etc.. i had to give a bit of thought to the purpose of these boxes in which box by fit in. so, i was born in iran and it is in the continent of asia, a marked agent. so, in asian. you should have seen the look on the administrator when i turned in my application. today those boxes no longer applied. we all live in one world and we are all the same. we are part of the same energy. we can no longer take the attitude of not in my backyard. in today's world, if someone in china sneezes, we all catch the flu in san francisco. we have seen the impact of such a ripple effect in the recent economic crisis. in today's global economy, peace in the least, the aids epidemic in a
that has arisen over the years -- a lot of the leading engineers in the technology industry tend to meet with each other at an burning man, recognize kindred spirits, something like that. the most recent case would be eric schmidt meeting with the founders of google up there. that would reportedly one of the big factors. what is it that makes burning man such a haven for that kind of connection? >> several factors. you think about the culture of silicon valley. eric schmidt had been some interesting papers. he had been making the point that so much of the tech industry is project-based learning. google gives people time off to do what they want. they give them time to explore and hang out with other people, outside of the framework of this more structured enterprise. burning man, from the very beginning is project-based learning. it attracts people from every demographic that you can think of, every category. so you have to, potentially, encyclopedic knowledge assembled at this place. and the natural way to learn is project-based. scholarship is fine, academic models can be useful for ce
guard. >> from more information, visit >> good morning, everybody. welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a
in the areas of health care, hospitality, biotech, and the technology in general. we have become dependent on city college for their ability to prepare the future work forces and because of the outstanding training that the college of fords, our economic future is directly tied to the success of our city college. so it is with that that i am presenting today a very important decision. in recognizing the importance of our city college to us as a city, i also want to make sure that we recognize as a family the serious challenges that are before the trustees and before the interim chancellor as we would care to meet them. there will be very difficult and important decision that will need to be made in order to address the recommendations that are set forth by the accreditation committee. there will also be a lot of good faith negotiation that will have to happen in order to protect our city college. but tough decisions and reforms are what city college needs at this time. and we must first protect and serve the students of city college and make sure they remain have our number one priority. b
and volunteers to transform lives through digital literacy. our big right now is the broadband technology opportunity program, a federally funded project through the department of aging so we're working in 26 locations, our volunteers are trained to be tutors and trainers offering everything from basic classes all the way to genealogy and job search. >> to me, a computer aon auxiliary brain, it's like knowing how to use your brain, how important is that. i think it's important and possibly seniors, it's important for them to stay in touch. er >> people like facebook or skype so they can connect to their family members or see their family member's albums from far away. >> (speaking spanish). >> what we like to focus on is transferring skills from volunteer to learner to help them get on to facebook, find housing on craig's list, being able to connect with friends and family. >> i decided teaching them what i knew and that got me into wanting to give back and to learning more and how it works. >> i discover -- i discovered that seniors need a lot of review. >> i am beginner so little by
graduated than men. we have the technologies to figure this out. we need to get the billion dollar beauty companies supporting this research. of course the power of act vision, opi nail products. they are the largest seller of largest products worldwide, 70 countries. they are using -- why don't you take it out of your u.s. products. they weren't too keen on that. we think the europeans are crazy. opi has fun names like i am not really a waitress red. we decided to do a spoof and we came up with our own names, like i can't believe it is a carcinogen. we dressed up with sashes that said mistreatment. this all happened in may, by august the company announced they were taking out formaldehyde and now advertising all of their products are free of those chemicals. >> [applause]. >> that was a huge victory and it show that is we can change the industry, they are responsive and they can change on a dime relatively quickly. we have products and they work wonderfully and the prices didn't go. there is an initial resistance, we see it is possible to change this industry and happening very quickly.
. increasing costs are forcing discussions about how we provide services. technology is requiring that we move more quickly than we have in a long time. building a network of partners to support our city government at this time will be more important than ever and will be critical as we were to emerge from the recession. we have a real opportunity here. we also have a real responsibility to help investment and success of our city. spur is committed to making this happen. we hope that all of you join us as we work to leverage a lot of these partnerships once again. spur is a nonprofit. member-supported think tank in san francisco committed to the success of the city in all its forms. many of you are already members. can we get a show of hands of spur members? that's fantastic. thank you so much for your continued support of our organization. without your help, none of this would be possible. for those of you who are not yet members, i hope you'll join us and get involved. roll up your sleeves and really get involved in the nuts and bolts of the city. we can all work together to engage the city
done. we have invested in technology. we've got great websites that ann cronenberg that the vest have embraced with our he can knowledge jai partners. we have the learn sf that i'm personally on. i receive those messages religiously of anything that might happen. of course, with critical mass this week, i was on that cell phone all the time to see whether or not anything in the city was out of character that we really had to make sure we covered. but all the other events as well. we have a great website. that's been our main stay for the public to learn and understand what it is to be better prepared. we've also had, of course, more fun ones for people to engage themselves, families and kids on quake sf, a quake quiz sf and learn through a series of questions what it takes for people to actually be better prepared as well. we have had over 190 sirens in our city that utilize the multi-cultural languages to warn people about -- we've been testing them very regularly to make sure they work. the new things we're doing to bring disaster preparedness, to bring the relationships that i thin
it impacts adjacent neighbors or not, it's really hard to determine. but it's a common enough technology these days, it's common enough to use it also for water-proofing purposes when you do certain types of injection. so i think that, at this point, i do not see anything in the appellant's appeal to warrant that we either condition or seriously review further the permit. >> president hwang: i'm similarly inclined to hold the permit. i think i'm sympathetic that as the neighboring adjacent property owner, you have concerns about this massive and complicated project happening right next to you. and i think, you know, raising those concerns puts them on clear notice that should anything come up that impacts your home, you know, you've -- it's already been discussed. i don't think, however, we have enough before us to undo the work from the assessment of the department in issuing the permit. >> i appreciate commissioner fung's analysis in the framing it in terms of the potential risk versus any kind of known flaw. and so i would concur. >> vice president fung: i move to uphold the permit an
economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension funds in line, our state employees have not had a raise in four years. it has been difficult all the way around. the real challenge has been to try and turn public sentiment and get people to recognize it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom up process and we asked them what they want
-packard or steve jobs. the seats we plant brings the vast forests of new products and new technologies and new patents in the future. that is where we have to -- we have to keep our eye on the main thought here. that is the discipline, the imagination, and the investment. that is what makes california -- that is why people are still coming here. they're not staying in colorado, i am sorry to say. they're right here. [applause] >> just briefly, setting aside plunder for a moment. >> i am sorry about plunder. it is a big part of wealth creation. >> could you talk briefly about your turn initiative? >> it is going well. mike rossi is leading the charge. i have met with what i think will be the next president of china. we have delegations from china to come here. we're sending delegations there. this is not just business as usual. we're getting detailed committees and proposals, a couple of the key states. we want good coming this way. we want good going out way. -- goods coming this way and we want goods going out that way. >> are you doing anything like that? >> we have been working on the north
in the right direction with the police department, but there is a lot of things to work on. technology is something we really need to focus on and make investments in in order to allow our police forces to be more effective, to be able to communicate more clearly with other law-enforcement agencies. that is something that we do need to work on. with regards to crime in the district, i would say that our district is more impacted by a lot of property crime. we see many cars being broken into. many quality of life issues -- graffiti. we see cars being stolen, those kinds of issues. we do have other kinds of incidences. shootings that might have occurred, but they are not as frequent. our quality of life issues and burglary issues are more prevalent. with some of the recent changes with the police department to get investigators out to the district stations, i think that has been a big improvement and will help focus some of the investigators' time to deal with crimes that people might not think our high impact, but have a big footprint in terms of our district's crime rates. but governor
legislation, including the use of electronic monitoring technology. in addition to that, we will be opening a community assessment services center that will provide wraparound services, again providing opportunity to change their lives. education and service and skill development is key for long-term change. thank you. [applause] >> ok, i know it is getting hot in here. hang on. we only have 13 more speakers. just kidding. i would like to bring up one of our newest community partners. >> good morning, everyone. when we moved into this community, we wanted to have a space that will be designated for reaching our community and kids and how symbolic and fitting it is for us to be gathered here as we applaud our mayor and his administration for his engaging mannerism over the past several months, as myself and several members of our faith community have been the recipients of his encouragement, his open door, his open heart, and his open hands to listen to our voices as we have expressed the concerns of our community in and around safety and violence in the neighborhoods. our mayor has heard th
of new evidence-based practices. in this new age of electronic technology, we're going to see more and more need for electronic health records. hit systems are going to be a godsend for our profession. being able to share that, that demographic information and treatment plans and progress notes is going to be very important to help that person move quicker in their recovery and get more comprehensive recovery. if a recovering person can find employment early on in their recovery, it lends self-value. it helps a person's self-image to feel gainfully employed. i like to tell employers, when i do employer training, that the thing about people in recovery is that you know what their issue is. you don't have to guess. i believe it's very important to the person in recovery, for a sense of self-responsibility and human dignity, and for the employer, in seeing that he has a workforce that's largely untapped, that's willing to work and will be loyal to the employer. the reason why i got into this profession is because of my family history. in my own recovery, i started using before the age
. the grouting procedure is very well established, very widely used procedure. this isn't a new technology. these aren't new characters involved in the procedure. do you have any questions? >> well the appellant is obviously concerned about the risk of it extending under his structure. can you address that? >> the way that the grout is injected is through a tube that gets advanced about two feet at a time. the grout contractor is actually paid by volume of grout. and that is what they're monitoring the whole time. so with the geotechnical input that larry's provided, that mr. carp's provided, they know how dense the sand is, as they're going down. it's a very experienced firm that does this. so they only want that two foot bulb of grout, that two foot column of grout. because anything more than that, they're going to have to excavate it, and they're going to see it in the volume. so i'm not sure why that's such a concern, when the -- are right there controlling this procedure. they're controlling the volume of grout. >> there is no risk of it expanding underneath impact -- >> there's not z
technology, it is one of those credible tools that while people are disenfranchised in what is going on in sacramento with the lack of transparency, we can have a much more service-oriented government that reengages people. >> so speaking of service orientation, what do you think that the government should do? and where should the government step aside? >> in terms of... >> what do you think is the role of government? it is a very general question. >> so, the role of government is to provide basic services that the private sector would just not provide. i mean, education, i mean, it is infrastructure, that means social services that means, giving people basic tools that they might not otherwise have. so really giving people in my mind an opportunity to succeed. and when the private sector, which can fall short in many areas are not providing, you know, basic services like food, or housing, or that is the role of government to step in. and we have to, we have to restore faith in our system of government. because if people do not believe that the government will spend money well, than
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)